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  • First-hand experience of HAMS.online - an interview
    We talked to the head keeper of the Szuhavölgy Landowners’ Hunt Club in Hungary
    Read the full story
  • The Science Behind the Shot: Deer Physiology During Hunting*
    What actually happens to the animal after we take our shot?
    Read the full story
  • The animal ran off after the shot - what now?
    Things we can do after deer run off after the shot
    Read the full story
  • Case study of hunting club management with HAMS.online
    How HAMS.online improved and simplified the management of a hunt club
    Read the full story
First-hand experience of HAMS.online - an interview

First-hand experience of HAMS.online - an interview

[Translated from the original]


"Do you know a good gunsmith?" 

"Do you know this kind of scope? And what's your experience?" 

These are questions we ask our friends and acquaintances when we're considering a new product or a new service provider. Like many, I do the same, because we all want to make the right decision and spend our hard-earned money on a good product or service.

Personal referrals and recommendations are always better than reading anonymous reviews.

The situation is similar to the electronic wildlife management system. Some people are already predicting the death of the beauty of hunting without ever having tried such a system or even spoken to someone who uses one on a daily basis. 

So I decided to look into this topic because I would like to talk to someone who has actually "tested driven one" and not just seen it from pictures.

After some searching and phone calls, I managed to find the Szuhavölgy Landowners’ Hunt Club in Hungary, which was one of the first to start using the electronic wildlife management system on a daily basis. They use a system called HAMS.online, and their members have 5 years of experience in using the system. 

We talked to the head keeper of the club, Kálmán Galambos.


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The Science Behind the Shot: Deer Physiology During Hunting*

The Science Behind the Shot: Deer Physiology During Hunting*

Many things need to be considered during hunting, but what actually happens to the animal after we take our shot?

Dr Joe R. Bumgardner, a surgeon and hunter in the United States, shared his expertise in surgery whilst explaining the physiology of harvesting deer on a recent episode of the Deer University podcast of the Mississippi State University Deer Lab.

Following Dr Bumgardner’s advice, we can increase the success of our harvests by understanding deer physiology and applying this knowledge in the field. 

What follows is a summary of the episode of the podcast.

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The animal ran off after the shot - what now?

The animal ran off after the shot - what now?

It’s usually quite a challenge to find deer that has been shot and run off. So what can or should we do in these situations? Dr Joe R. Bumgardner, a surgeon and hunter in the United States, shared his expertise in the Deer University podcast of the Mississippi State University Deer Lab.

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Case study of hunting club management with HAMS.online

Case study of hunting club management with HAMS.online

This presentation showcases how the use of HAMS.online can have major benefits for any club even well managed hunt clubs.

The changes in less organised estates or syndicates is even more significant due to the practices, processes and workflows HAMS.online is built around and provides.


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Pheasant rearing & its dangers

Pheasant rearing & its dangers

We all know that the ring-necked pheasant is by far the most popular game bird for shooting in the UK. As people who take part in field sports, most of us love to participate in driven or walked-up pheasant shooting that ends in a feeling of pride in what we have achieved, contentment and ultimately a delicious meal that we have earned. 

Also, many shooters probably know that most pheasants that live on our estates, if not all, were reared on a farm and then released in order for us to shoot them. This is nothing new, as we have been rearing pheasants most likely since they were introduced to Europe by the Normans or Romans, centuries ago.

However, is the hand-rearing and releasing of our beloved bird such a good idea? Are there negative effects that we don’t know about or are just choosing to ignore?

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Case study of Coillte management with HAMS.online

Case study of Coillte management with HAMS.online

This case study showcases how HAMS.online is being utilised by Coillte to streamline processes, reduce admin, improve health and safety, and fulfil land and wildlife potential.

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Flying through wildlife science: ringing Eurasian woodcocks in Hungary

Flying through wildlife science: ringing Eurasian woodcocks in Hungary

You probably already know him, the little brown bird with the long beak that likes to “dance” as it walks. The Eurasian woodcock is a small, wading bird that can be found and hunted in many European countries. 

It is a migratory bird that flies not so much from North to South, but rather from East to West, looking for warmer wintering grounds. During this migration, some birds that reside in Hungary are caught and ringed before they continue their way to the UK and France.

Let’s look at this process in more detail.

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Communicating wildlife conservation to the general public

Communicating wildlife conservation to the general public

Three young, early-career wildlife professionals from different countries; David Chandrasekhar (Australia), Paige Hellbaum (U.S.), and Thabang Teffo (South Africa) held a panel discussion about communicating wildlife conservation to the general public during the 35th Congress of the International Union of Game Biologists in Budapest, Hungary.

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Who is Saint Hubertus and why is he the Patron Saint of Hunters?

Who is Saint Hubertus and why is he the Patron Saint of Hunters?

The legend of how Hubertus converted and became the patron Saint of hunters and importantly why he is symbolic of our respect for nature as a community.

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A brown hare live capture

A brown hare live capture

Like any other hunt day, the day started early. By the time we woke, the sun still hadn’t risen and it looked set to be wet, gloomy and overcast, so it was straight on with the warm coats and wellies.

Due to the decrease of the Hungarian brown hare population, we had a 2-hour drive from the North Hungarian Mountains to the Great Plain that ranges from the central to the southern and eastern borders of the country. This is the region where numerous brown hare populations can still be found.

As we arrived at the edge of the small Hungarian village the sun decided to greet us although the beauty of it wasn’t enough to quell our hungry stomachs. Fortunately, you can always trust in Hungarian hospitality and we were welcomed with hot coffees and teas and freshly baked “pogácsa” (a traditional tasty Hungarian treat similar to cheese scones).

So with our stomachs finally content, we could turn our thoughts to the day’s schedule.

By the time we arrived, one out of three captures of the day had already been completed, so, after the introduction and the quick breakfast, we were placed on two tractors and headed to the field where the second capture was to take place.

After lining the beaters up in the muddy field (which was definitely not an easy task) we were ready to go...

But how exactly does a live capture work?

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About HAMS.online
  • HAMS.online is built and maintained by Bit and Pixel Kft which has more than 15 years of experience in the design and development of custom built, high security systems and over twenty years of hunting and gamekeeping experience.
  • Phone number: +36 30 950 33 82
  • E-mail: [email protected]
Designed, Built & Powered by
Hosting provider
  • RACKFOREST KFT.
  • H-1132, Hungary, Budapest
  • Victor Hugo utca. 18-22.
  • Phone number: 0-24: +36 70 362 4785
  • rackforest.com
We are looking for
Regional representatives
  • - If you are familiar with wildlife management, gamekeeping
  • - and if you are interested in the representation of HAMS in your country or on regional level, please feel free to contact us via e-mail.

Be part of this amazing team of international professionals, let's build the future of wildlife management together.