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  • The Science Behind the Shot: Deer Physiology During Hunting*
    What actually happens to the animal after we take our shot?
    Read the full story
  • The animal ran off after the shot - what now?
    Things we can do after deer run off after the shot
    Read the full story
  • Case study of hunting club management with HAMS.online
    How HAMS.online improved and simplified the management of a hunt club
    Read the full story
  • Pheasant rearing & its dangers
    Is the hand-rearing and releasing of our beloved bird such a good idea?
    Read the full story
The Science Behind the Shot: Deer Physiology During Hunting*

The Science Behind the Shot: Deer Physiology During Hunting*

Many things need to be considered during hunting, but what actually happens to the animal after we take our shot?

Dr Joe R. Bumgardner, a surgeon and hunter in the United States, shared his expertise in surgery whilst explaining the physiology of harvesting deer on a recent episode of the Deer University podcast of the Mississippi State University Deer Lab.

Following Dr Bumgardner’s advice, we can increase the success of our harvests by understanding deer physiology and applying this knowledge in the field. 

What follows is a summary of the episode of the podcast.

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Flying through wildlife science: ringing Eurasian woodcocks in Hungary

Flying through wildlife science: ringing Eurasian woodcocks in Hungary

You probably already know him, the little brown bird with the long beak that likes to “dance” as it walks. The Eurasian woodcock is a small, wading bird that can be found and hunted in many European countries. 

It is a migratory bird that flies not so much from North to South, but rather from East to West, looking for warmer wintering grounds. During this migration, some birds that reside in Hungary are caught and ringed before they continue their way to the UK and France.

Let’s look at this process in more detail.

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A deep dive into science: microscopic analysis of herbivore faeces

A deep dive into science: microscopic analysis of herbivore faeces

In order to successfully manage wildlife populations in a specific area, it is essential to know the diet of the given species, so we can effectively manage their habitat. One of the scientific methods to analyse the diet composition of herbivores is to investigate the faeces. Let’s see the steps of a microscopic analysis.

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About HAMS.online
  • HAMS.online is built and maintained by Bit and Pixel Kft which has more than 15 years of experience in the design and development of custom built, high security systems and over twenty years of hunting and gamekeeping experience.
  • Phone number: +36 30 950 33 82
  • E-mail: [email protected]
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