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Glossary

Glossary of Hunting, Wildlife and Game Management terms
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A
A Young Shot
Young Shots are youngsters involved in shooting and is a term that’s generally used up until they’re in their late teens. Source: Shooting UK
Accidental discharge
unintentional firing of a gun or rifle. Source: Shooting UK
Accounted for
Hunting euphemism for the killing of the fox. Also known as Bowled Over, Brought to Book, Punished, Dealt With. Source: The Hunting Act
Action
The mechanism of a gun or rifle including its loading, firing and unloading. Source: Shooting UK
Airgun
Gun discharged by compressed air or gas. Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Antlers
Pair of bony outgrowths on the head of a male deer Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Artificial Target
Clay or card target used for shooting competitions or practice. Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Autumn Hunting (Cub hunting)
The early part of the season, from around August to the beginning of the Main season. Source: EQUUS England
B
BB
A small ball bearing used in some types of airguns. Also refers to a specific size of shot found in shotgun cartridges used for large game. Source: Shooting UK
Babble
A hound babbles when it speaks unnecessarily. Source: The Hunting Act
Bag
Total number of birds or animals shot in one day/session Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Balled up
A coursed hare has balled up feet when they are clay clogged. Source: The Hunting Act
Ballistic co-efficient
the measurement which shows how streamlined a bullet is and how efficiently it flies through the air. Source: Shooting UK
Beater
Person who flushes wild game Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Beaters
A group of people who drive game forward and out of cover. Source: Shooting UK
Beware hole
A call for riders to be careful of potholes, rabbit holes, etc. whilst riding – often pronounced as “war ‘ole” (‘ware hole). Source: EQUUS England
Biddable
Hounds are said to be biddable when they are at their most responsive, that is, when they have just checked. Source: The Hunting Act
Bitch
A female hound. A “hot bitch” indicates a female hound that is in season. Source: EQUUS England
Blacking/Bluing
The protective coating on the metal segments of a rifle or shotgun which is blue or black. Source: Shooting UK
Blank
A huntsman and hounds draw a blank when they fail to put up a quarry from the area they were searching. The covert can said to be blank.Failure to find quarry all day is a blank day. Source: The Hunting Act
Bobbery Pack
A hunting pack made up of local dogs including hounds, terriers, lurchers, and sheepdogs. Source: EQUUS England
Body corporate
The legal term for a corporation, i.e. a limited company. Source: The Hunting Act
Bolt
To cause the quarry to leave a place of shelter or underground refuge so that it may be chased or killed. In fox and mink hunting the quarry was often bolted by use of terriers so that it could be hunted again by hounds. Source: The Hunting Act
Bolt Action
When you manually-operate the bolt to load and unload a gun. Bolt actions are usually found on rifles, but they sometimes are also used on smaller shotguns for instance a .410. Source: Shooting UK
Bore Interior
The diameter of the barrel of a firearm, or calibre of a shotgun. Source: Shooting UK
Brace
A pair of shot quarry. For instance, a brace of pheasants is two pheasants. Source: Shooting UK
Break up
The eating of the quarry by hounds. Source: The Hunting Act
Breech
The end of the barrel nearest the shooter where bullets, cartridges and pellets are loaded. Source: Shooting UK
Bring to bay
Hounds bring a deer to bay to bay when they run it to exhaustion and it turns to face them. Source: The Hunting Act
Brock
A colloquial term for a badger. Source: EQUUS England
Brush
The fox’s tail. Source: The Hunting Act
Buck
A male Fallow or Roe deer; also a male hare. Source: The Hunting Act
Bullet
Single projectile fired out of a rifle Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Bye-day
Any hunting day other than on that is advertised; an extra day. Source: The Hunting Act
C
Cap
The daily charge or donation from riders who do not usually subscribe to the hunt. Source: EQUUS England
Car please
Shouted to tell followers to let a car through. Source: EQUUS England
Cartridge
Metal (rifle) or plastic (shotgun) casing containing propellant charge and projectile Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Cast
The angle of the stock to the centre line of the bore, which enables the shooter’s eye to line up, with the centre line of the bore Source: Shooting UK
Cast
When hounds search for the lost line of the quarry.The huntsman may take charge of the pack and cast the hounds towards where he/she thinks the hounds will pick up the line or the hounds may cast themselves. Source: The Hunting Act
Centre Fire
A cartridge with a primer placed in the centre of the cartridge. This type of cartridge is suited to high power ammunition Source: Shooting UK
Chamber length
Chamber lengths in shotguns are usually 2½, 2¾ or 3 inch (65, 70 and 76mm). It is important that you know the chamber length of your gun before buying and using cartridges because if you use the wrong size there is a chance you could seriously injure yourself as well as damage your gun. Source: Shooting UK
Charlie
Hunting term for the fox. Also Charles James and Mr Todd. Source: The Hunting Act
Check
When hounds temporarily lose the line. Source: The Hunting Act
Choke
Chokes are fitted to gun barrels to restrict the width which has the effecting of ‘focusing’ the shot on the target Source: Shooting UK
Chop
The killing of the quarry by the hounds without a chase. Source: The Hunting Act
Clapped
When a hare has stopped and hides herself by flattening her body on the ground. Source: The Hunting Act
Clay pigeon/clay
Disc of pitch and chalk thrown into the air as a target for shotgun competitions or practice Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Close season
Dates during which a quarry species is protected by law and may not be shot Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Code of practice
Set of rules by which the shooting industry regulates behaviour Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Couch
See Seat. Source: The Hunting Act
Country
The area within which a particular pack hunts. Source: The Hunting Act
Country Sports
Sports carried out in the countryside, such as shooting and fishing Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Couple
Two hounds. Packs of hounds are counted in couples. A single hound is one hound, not half a couple. Source: The Hunting Act
Cover
The area in which the quarry hides. Cover can be woodland, hedgerows, crops (specific crops such as maize, kale or mustard can attract game and these are known as cover crops) Source: Shooting UK
Cry
See Speak. Source: The Hunting Act
Cubbing or cub hunting
The period immediately preceding fox hunting. Starts from around mid to late August until the Opening meet normally the last Saturday in October or the first Saturday in November when young hounds are trained to hunt and fox cubs are predominately hunted. Also known as Autumn hunting. Source: The Hunting Act
Cull
To kill selectively (especially old and weak) animals, to maintain the health of the herd Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Cur dog
A canine which is not a hound. Source: EQUUS England
D
Damascus barrels
An early way of making barrels by welding strips of metal together around a rod and forge welding them together. This created a beautiful effect, but the barrels are not very strong Source: Shooting UK
Decoy
A dummy designed to lure birds, especially woodpigeon, within shooting range. Also refers to a pond used for trapping ducks Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Deer Stalker
Person who approaches deer without being noticed in order to shoot selected animals Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Digging Out
The use of spades, metal bars or even adapted walking sticks to dig down into a tunnel system to find a fox. Terriers were used to locate the fox before it was killed. Source: The Hunting Act
Doe
A female Fallow deer or Roe deer. also a female hare. Source: The Hunting Act
Dog
A male hound. Source: EQUUS England
Dominant eye
This is the stronger eye and is usually the eye a person would favour when looking down a telescope Source: Shooting UK
Drag
Scent left by a hare or a mink. In drag hunting the drag is the artificial scent laid for the hounds to follow. Source: The Hunting Act
Drag Hunt
Drag hunting, or draghunting, is a form of equestrian sport, where mounted riders hunt the trail of an artificially laid scent with hounds. Source: Wikipedia
Draw
When hounds search through covert in search of the quarry. Source: The Hunting Act
Draw a blank
To draw a covert without finding the quarry. Source: The Hunting Act
Driven (shoot)
Form of sport in which game birds are flushed over the standing Guns Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Drop at heel
drop at comb, drop at toe These are measurements of how much the stock drops in certain places below the rib of the gun Source: Shooting UK
Dry-firing
Using an unloaded pistol or airgun to practice shooting techniques. Target shooters use it to build up muscle memory. Be warned, dry firing can damage the action on some firearms unless snap caps (see below) are used Source: Shooting UK
E
Ear defenders
These are vital to protect the shooter’s hearing when firing a shotgun or firearms Source: Shooting UK
Earth
An underground tunnel where a fox may take refuge that can include a badger sett or drain. Source: The Hunting Act
Earth stopper
Someone employed by the hunt to block or ‘stop’ fox earths and badger setts in the areas to be hunted. This occurs prior to the hunt taking place, normally the night before. Source: The Hunting Act
Ejector
A mechanism that removes the cartridge from the breech of the gun after firing Source: Shooting UK
Elevation
The upward or downward adjustment of a sight Source: Shooting UK
Entered
An entered hound is one that has hunted for one season or more. During the first season the hound may be referred to an an un-entered hound. Source: The Hunting Act
Estate
Land over which farming, forestry and shooting activities take place Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Estuary
Tidal area where a river reaches the sea Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Eye relief
The distance between the shooter’s eye and the ocular lens (the lens nearest the eye) of the scope Source: Shooting UK
F
Falconry
The keeping, training and / or sport of hunting with falcons or other birds of prey. Source: EQUUS England
Falconry
Hunting with the aid of birds of prey. Source: The Hunting Act
Feather
When a hound thinks it owns the line but is uncertain it will not speak and instead will wave its tail (stern) or ‘feather’ and move along the assumed line. Source: The Hunting Act
Feather or Feathering
When a hound is on the line but is uncertain, it will not speak and instead will wave or ‘feather’ its tail (stern) and move along the assumed line. Source: EQUUS England
Felt wad
This separates the powder in the shotgun cartridge from the shot and pushes the shot down the barrel after the powder has ignited. Made from wood fibre, it is biodegradable unlike a plastic wad Source: Shooting UK
Ferreting
Ferrets are put down rabbit warrens to make the rabbits bolt outside into a waiting net. The rabbits are then shot immediately or dispatched humanely with a priest Source: Shooting UK
Field
The mounted followers. Source: EQUUS England
Field Master
The Master in charge of leading the Field. Source: EQUUS England
Fieldsports
See Country Sports Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Firearms certificate
A licence needed to own firearms, or airguns over 12ft.lbs power. (See advice on how to get one) Source: Shooting UK
Firing pin
A small steel pin which strikes the metal primer of a cartridge to ignite the powder which then explodes pushing the bullet (rifle) or pellets (shotgun) out of the barrel Source: Shooting UK
Fixed sights
Sometimes called open sights, these are iron sights mounted on the rifle’s barrel Source: Shooting UK
Flight
Movement of pigeon or wildfowl at dawn and dusk between resting and feeding areas Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Flight pond
Area of water into which wildfowl drop to feed and roost Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Flightline
Paths in the sky routinely taken by birds to move between roosting and feeding areas Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Flinch
A nervous twitch caused by firing a firearm and is often caused by the shooter fearing the recoil of a firearm. It can ruin accuracy Source: Shooting UK
Flush
To rouse game Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Foil
Any smell or disturbed ground that spoils the line. Source: The Hunting Act
Form
See Seat. Source: The Hunting Act
Ft.lbs
The way the energy output of a rifle or airgun is measured Source: Shooting UK
Full metal jacket
The copper covering of a lead bullet that allows the barrel to be driven up the barrel faster than a pure lead bullet Source: Shooting UK
Full-bore
Usually refers to rifles larger than .22 calibre that use centre- fire (see above) ammunition Source: Shooting UK
G
Game
Species of wild animals and birds deignated in law and hunted for sport and food Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Gamekeeper
Person who rears game birds for release into the wild and manages their habitat Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Gate please
Called down the line to alert the last person to close a gate behind them. Source: EQUUS England
Gather
When the Huntsman blows certain notes on the hunting horn to gather the hounds together or to signal the end of hunting for the day – to “blow the gather”. Source: EQUUS England
Ghillie
A hunting guide, particularly in Scotland, who accompanies shooters or fishermen Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Given best
When the quarry is allowed to escape. Source: The Hunting Act
Gone away
When the fox has left covert and the chase is on. Source: The Hunting Act
Gone to ground/earth
When the hunted fox has taken refuge underground; usually a fox earth or badger sett but could include a drain, log pile or hay bale. Also Gone to Earth and Run to Ground. Source: The Hunting Act
Good morning
Used at the beginning of the day as a greeting, regardless of the time. Source: EQUUS England
Good night
Used to say goodbye whenever going home, even if it’s 1pm! Source: EQUUS England
Group size
The measurement of the patter of shots on a target for rifles and pistols Source: Shooting UK
Gun
A firearm or, when Gun is spelt with a capital G, the person using a shotgun Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Gun fit
The term used to fit a shotgun or rifle to an individual shooter’s body, so that the eye is aligned directly down the rib (shotgun) or scope (rifle). This produces much greater accuracy and usually minimizes the effect of recoil on the shooter Source: Shooting UK
Gundog
Specially bred and trained dog for locating, flushing and retrieving game Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
H
Hanging
To suspend meat so that the flavour matures Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Harbourer
A local deer expert employed by a stag hunt to select a suitable stag for hunting. Source: The Hunting Act
Hare Coursing
Hare coursing is the pursuit of hares by two dogs, predominantly greyhounds. The dogs are released from leads by a man called a “slipper” to chase the hare, and judges assess their skill in making the hare “turn” as it flees. Source: The Hunting Act
Head (of game)
Number shot Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Headed
When the quarry is made to change direction. Source: The Hunting Act
Heel
Hounds are hunting heel or are hunting the heel line when they hunt the line in the opposite direction to which the quarry has run. Source: The Hunting Act
Her
The hunted hare is referred to as ‘her’ irrespective of whether it is male or female. Source: The Hunting Act
Hide
Place of concealment blending into the natural environment Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Him
The hunted fox is always referred to as ‘him’ irrespective of whether it is male or female. Source: The Hunting Act
Hind
Female Red deer. Source: The Hunting Act
Hold hard
Called by the Field Master to stop the Field immediately. Source: EQUUS England
Holding up
Fox hunting: Positioning the field/foot followers around a covert to keep the fox cubs and hounds inside during cub hunting. Hare hunting: Keeping the hounds in a tight group around the huntsman. Source: The Hunting Act
Holloa
Pronounced ‘holler’. A high-pitched yell made by a person who has seen the quarry to attract the attention of the huntsman and is often accompanied by holding a cap or arm in the air in the direction taken by the quarry. Source: The Hunting Act
Horn
Used by the huntsman to control and communicate with the hounds - e.g. to encourage them or call them back - or to signify the end of the day. Source: EQUUS England
Hounds
Dogs that hunt by scent are referred to as hounds. Source: The Hunting Act
Hounds please
To tell hunt followers to move out of the way. Source: EQUUS England
Hunt Staff
Responsible for working the hounds (e.g. Huntsman, Whipper-in, etc.). Source: EQUUS England
Hunting
The pursuit and killing of a selected wild bird or animal for food, sport or management Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Huntsman
The rider who hunts/follows and controls the hounds. Source: EQUUS England
I
Inter-tidal
Area covered by water only at high tide. Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
J
Jink
A sharp right-angled turn by the quarry to evade the pursuing hounds. Source: The Hunting Act
K
Kick on
If a rider stops or makes way for a Master at a gate or jump and the Master says you may go on ahead. Source: EQUUS England
L
Laid-on
When hounds are introduced to the line. Source: The Hunting Act
Lamping
Night shooting of pests and predators using a powerful spotlamp Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Law
Fox hunting: The start given to a bolted fox before the hounds are released onto it’s line. Hare coursing: The start given to a hare before the greyhounds are released. Source: The Hunting Act
Lawn Meet
Hosts provide refreshments at this sociable type of meet. Source: EQUUS England
Leading
The ‘gunking up’ of the lands and grooves in a rifled barrel (see below) from bullets or airgun pellets. This can affect accuracy Source: Shooting UK
Let-off
The point at which the sears release the shot in a trigger mechanism. A crisp let-off means the trigger works rather like a switch and ‘creep’ refers to a more vague let-off point Source: Shooting UK
Line
The scent left by the running quarry. Source: The Hunting Act
Load
The number of shot pellets packed into a cartridge. This is measured in grams and known as the ‘total weight’ of the shot. Recoil will be heavier with a high load Source: Shooting UK
Load
To put a cartridge into a firearm, or the composition of a cartridge Source: Shooting UK
Locator
A radio receiving device used to track the signals from a radio transmitting device which is attached to the collar of a terrier used underground. The terrierman scans the ground above the tunnel system listening for the signal which indicated the progress and position of the terrier underground. Also Terrier finder. Source: The Hunting Act
Lock time
The time taken from the release of the sear by the trigger to the moment the primer is struck. In airguns it refers to the time taken from the release of the sear to the exiting of the pellet from the barrel Source: Shooting UK
Loose horse
Shouted if someone has fallen off and the horse is running away. Source: EQUUS England
M
Made Worker
Refers to a hound or terrier that is so experienced it can be relied upon to do its job without further training. Source: EQUUS England
Magazine
The part of a repeating rifle that stores ammunition ready for the next shot Source: Shooting UK
Mark
When hounds bay at the entrance of an earth or place where a fox has sought refuge. Source: The Hunting Act
Marking to ground
See Mark. Source: The Hunting Act
Mask
The dead fox or hare’s head. Source: The Hunting Act
Master
Person responsible for the running the hunt and talking to landowners, planning the route, etc. Source: EQUUS England
Meet
The arranged meeting place of a hunt. Source: The Hunting Act
Meet card
A list of dates and times when hunting will take place along with the location of the meet. Source: The Hunting Act
Mildot
This does not stand for “military” but refers to milliradian, which is a unitless measurement, similar to degrees Source: Shooting UK
Mildot reticle
A scope reticle designed around the measurement unit of a milliradian. This allows the shooter to calculate the distance of an object with known dimensions, helping range finding and accuracy Source: Shooting UK
Minute of angle (MOA)
Used by the military and target shooters and it is an angular measurement used as a reference for sight adjustment Source: Shooting UK
Mixed pack
A pack consisting of male and female hounds. Source: EQUUS England
Mute
A hound which hunts without speaking. Source: EQUUS England
Muzzle
The end of a barrel Source: Shooting UK
Muzzle energy
The energy with which a projectile leaves the barrel, usually measured in ft.lbs. Source: Shooting UK
Muzzle velocity
The speed at which a bullet or pellet leaves the barrel Source: Shooting UK
N
Negligent discharge
the unintentional firing of a rifle or gun Source: Shooting UK
O
Objective lens
Lens of a telescopic sight nearest the object being viewed Source: Shooting UK
Ocular lens
Lens on a telescopic sight nearest the shooter’s eye Source: Shooting UK
Open season
Dates during which quarry species may be taken legally, also known as the shooting season Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Open sights
Non-telescopic sights, sometimes called iron sights Source: Shooting UK
Opening meet
The start of formal hunting. Source: The Hunting Act
Over-and-under
Shotgun in which one barrel is on top of the other Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Over-travel
The amount of movement on the trigger after the sear has been released Source: Shooting UK
Overrun
When hounds shoot passed a change in direction of the line. Source: The Hunting Act
Own
Hounds are said to own the line when they pick up a scent. Source: The Hunting Act
P
Pads
Hunting term for the dead fox’s paws. Source: The Hunting Act
Parallax error
This occurs when the target image does not fall in the same optical plane as the reticle. This affects all scopes, but many have a parallax adjuster that focuses the scope at one range and aids accuracy. With high magnification scopes parallax error is particularly acute Source: Shooting UK
Peg
Where the Gun stands waiting to take a shot at the quarry. Pegs are each given numbers and Guns draw at random from cards numbered accordingly. Hogging the middle peg is considered bad form and each Gun will move to a different peg at the end of a drive Source: Shooting UK
Pellet
A projectile made of lead used in an airgun, which is usually shaped like a shuttlecock. Sometimes called a slug Source: Shooting UK
Pest
Animal that damages crops or wildlife, or represents a threat to health Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Picker-up
Person who retrieves dead and wounded game with the aid of gundogs Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Picking-up
It is the job of gundogs and their handlers to pick up fallen game and track down wounded birds (and dispatch them humanely). Source: Shooting UK
Plinking
A name given to informal target shooting with an airgun Source: Shooting UK
Plucking
The removal of feathers from a bird destined for the table Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Poacher
A person who kills or takes game belonging to another person without permission Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Point
The distance from putting up the quarry to the place at which hounds kill or lose it, measured as the crow flies. The actual distance is described ‘as the hounds ran’. Source: The Hunting Act
Point rider
The whipper-in or member of the field positioned at a strategic point on the edge of a covert to alert the huntsman if the quarry breaks. Source: The Hunting Act
Predator
An animal which hunts for food Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Prey
An animal hunted, or captured, by another for food Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Priest
An instrument used for dispatching injured game humanely Source: Shooting UK
Primer
A small charge fitted in the centre of a centre fire cartridge or around the rim of a rim fire to ignite the main charge in a cartridge Source: Shooting UK
Proof
Process of checking that that a firearm is safe which is usually done by firing a special test cartridge which exceeds the guns tolerances by 30% Source: Shooting UK
Proof mark
The mark that proves the gun is safe and has passed proof (see above) Source: Shooting UK
Puppy
A hound who is new to hunting that season - when weaned, young hounds will be sent off to hunt supporters to be raised, socialised and familiarised with livestock and other dogs so that they are well-behaved when hunting begins. Source: EQUUS England
Puss
Hunting term for a hare. Source: The Hunting Act
Put up
An animal is said to be put up when it is frightened by the hounds into running from them rather than remaining where it is. Source: The Hunting Act
Q
Quarry
This is your target of your shot – which may be a clay pigeon, a game bird, a rabbit, vermin or a deer. Source: Shooting UK
R
Ratcatcher
A tweed jacket. Worn during cub hunting and by visitors riding with the hunt. Source: The Hunting Act
Rate
When a hound is reprimanded. The huntsman or whipper-in rates a hound or hounds when it/they riots or strays too far from the pack. He/she will shout in harsh tones "leave it", "get back to ‘im" or similar and can be accompanied with whip cracking. Source: The Hunting Act
Rearing and releasing
The act of breeding game birds for release into the wild Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Recoil
The rearward movement of a rifle or shotgun when it is fired Source: Shooting UK
Refuge
A safe haven for wildlife where human activity is restricted Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Reloading
The process of refilling empty cartridge cases so they can be used again. This is done for economy and in the hope of increasing accuracy Source: Shooting UK
Reticle
The crosshairs on a telescopic sight Source: Shooting UK
Rifle
The barrels of this type of gun are rifled – marked with grooves which cause the bullet to spin, making it go further and hit more accurately. Rifles are used for killing quarry at a distance, cleanly and humanely. Ammunition is bullets and a firearms certificate (different from a shotgun licence) is required Source: Shooting UK
Riot
When hounds hunt something other than their intended quarry. Source: The Hunting Act
Rough shooting
A less formal version of walked up shooting (qv) usually involving a small group of Guns opportunistically shooting whatever legal quarry presents itself. Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Run to ground
See Gone to ground. Source: The Hunting Act
S
Scrape
See Seat. Source: The Hunting Act
Season
The time period in which hunting takes place. Source: EQUUS England
Seat
The small depression in the ground dug by a hare in which she lays. Also known as Scrape or Form. Source: The Hunting Act
Semi-automatic
A shotgun where cartridges are placed into a magazine which automatically loads the cartridges into the waiting chamber Source: Shooting UK
Shot
The lead or steel pellets contained in a shotgun cartridge; may also refer to the person using a gun Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Shotgun
A shotgun has single or double barrels and fires shot contained in cartridges, which are place in the chamber of the gun Source: Shooting UK
Shotgun certificate
If you own a shotgun the law is that you need to be in possession of a valid shotgun certificate. You can however apply for the certificate before you buy a gun. Certificates are currently valid for five years and you should allow several months for a certificate to be granted. Here’s how to apply for a shotgun certificate Source: Shooting UK
Shy
The structure that hides the ‘slipper’ from the hare as it is urged forward into the field at a hare coursing event. Source: The Hunting Act
Side-by-side
Shotgun in which one barrel is alongside the other Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Sinking
A fox is said to be sinking when it is very tired. Source: The Hunting Act
Slipper
The person who releases the two greyhounds to chase a hare at a coursing event. Source: The Hunting Act
Slots
The feet of deer or their footprints. The slots are removed after the kill and mounted. Source: The Hunting Act
Snapcap
An inert cartridge used to release the tension on the firing pin spring of a shotgun or for dry-fire a rifle Source: Shooting UK
Speak
Hounds are said to speak or are speaking when they yelp or bark excitedly when following a scent. Also known as Giving tongue, Voice or In cry. Source: The Hunting Act
Stalk
To hunt quarry by following it stealthily or waiting in ambush. Source: The Hunting Act
Stalker
See deer stalker Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Stern
A hound’s tail. Source: The Hunting Act
Stopping out
The practice of blocking up fox earth and badger sett entrances prior to a hunt taking place, to prevent the hunted fox from going to ground. Source: The Hunting Act
Sustainable harvest
The amount which can be shot without detriment to the population as a whole Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Syndicate
Group of people who shoot together, sharing the costs of a day’s or season’s sport Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
T
Tally-Ho
Pronounced Tally-O. A call made to indicate that a fox has been seen. If the huntsman is not in speaking distance a ‘holloa’ would be given instead. Source: The Hunting Act
Tally-ho away
A call to indicate that the fox has left covert. Also Gone away. Source: The Hunting Act
Tally-ho back
A call to indicate that the fox has returned to covert from whence it came. Source: The Hunting Act
Tally-ho over
Call made to indicate that the fox has crossed a road, track or a clearing in covert. Also Tally-Over. Source: The Hunting Act
Telescopic sight
A sight which is rather like a telescope and magnifies the target Source: Shooting UK
The bore line
An imaginary line running from the muzzle of a gun along the centre of the barrel. Source: Shooting UK
The rut
The mating season for deer and runs from the end of September to November. During the rut or rutting period mature stags leave their bachelor groups to seek out hinds at traditional rutting sites where they attempt to defend groups of hinds in an attempt to prevent mating from other stags. During the rut the stags will engage in roaring contests which may escalate in parallel walking and locking of antlers. Source: The Hunting Act
Throw up
When hounds lose the line and check they lift their heads and look around for help or ‘throw up’. Source: The Hunting Act
Tipping
It is customary to tip the keeper at the end of the day, who will divide up tips amongst the beaters and pickers-up. As an old-fashioned rule, it’s £30 for the first 100 birds and then £10 for every 100 after that. However, if the Gun has had a particularly good day then generosity should prevail Source: Shooting UK
Tongue
See Speak. Source: The Hunting Act
Trap
Mechanical device to capture legal pest and predatory species. Also the device which throws clay pigeons Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Trencher fed
Term used for hounds that are not looked after as a pack but by individuals and brought together as a pack on hunting days. Source: The Hunting Act
Trigger blade
Device operated by the shooter’s finger that operates the trigger system to fire the gun Source: Shooting UK
Trigger mechanism
The device that uses sears to release the firing pin of a firearm, or release the mechanism of an airgun to fire the shot Source: Shooting UK
Trophy (head)
Head or full body of an animal or bird preserved for display by taxidermy Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Tufters
The more experienced hounds in a pack used to separate the harboured stag from the rest of the herd. Source: The Hunting Act
Twelve bore
The bore of a gun is the diameter of its barrel; for shotguns this normally varies between a 28 bore (the smallest) and a four bore (the largest) The most commonly used size for sporting shooting is a twelve bore. Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
V
Velvet
Furry covering on the newly formed antlers of deer Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Vermin
See Pest and Predator Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Voice
See Speak. Source: The Hunting Act
W
Wad
packing that keeps the shot in position in the cartridge. Wad can be made from plastic, fibre or felt Source: Shooting UK
Wad cutter
A bullet or pellet with a flat nose used for target shooting because they produce neat holes on the target Source: Shooting UK
Walked-up
Form of shooting in which the shooter flushes the quarry, usually using a dog, as he walks through cover Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Weight
Heavier guns generally absorb recoil better. Source: Shooting UK
Whipper-in
Hunt staff who help control the hounds. Source: EQUUS England
Wildfowler
Person who shoots ducks and geese on the foreshore Source: BASC - Glossary of shooting terms
Windage
The horizontal adjustment of a sight Source: Shooting UK
The HAMS company
  • HAMS is designed, built and maintained by Bit and Pixel Kft. Our company has more than 15 years of experience in the design and development of custom built, high security systems. Not to mention that the owner of Bit and Pixel has over twenty years of hunting and gamekeeping experience.
  • Phone: +36 30 950 33 82
  • E-mail: [email protected]
Designed, built & powered by
Hosting provider
  • RACKFOREST KFT.
  • H-1132, Hungary, Budapest
  • Victor Hugo utca. 18-22.
  • Phone: 0-24: +36 70 362 4785
  • rackforest.com
We are looking for
Regional representatives
  • - If you are familiar with wildlife management, gamekeeping and hunting,
  • - and if you are interested in the representation of HAMS in your country or on regional level, please feel free to contact us via email.

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